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Iroquois Hunter Pace
Sunday, September 7, 2014
For more details click here.

 

Welcome to the Iroquois Hunt Club

Community, Tradition, & Animal Welfare
The Iroquois Hunt Club is an integral part of the farming community in southern Fayette County. Although it is called a foxhunting club, the main function of the hunt is to keep the coyotes dispersed so they do not become a threat to livestock and house pets.

The hunt country is a ten square mile area of land used for many different types of farming.

Land Owners
The land owners allow the hunt club to put up jumps and gates in their fence lines so horseback riders can follow the hounds who are bred and trained to chase coyotes by scent. Because of the hunt, the coyotes are less apt to form packs and attack livestock, and farmers are not forced to eliminate them by poison or shooting. Coyotes are allowed to survive, and the hounds provide wonderful sport for hound, horse, coyote and fox lovers throughout the winter months.

Membership
The Iroquois membership is comprised of a diverse group of about 150 families that share an interest in hounds, land conservation and the historic traditions of foxhunting in America. Some of them are farmers and hunt country landowners, and some live in Lexington and the surrounding area.

The Hounds
The everyday routine of each hound includes several hours of playtime in 20 acres of fenced pasture and woods that surround the south side of the barn. They sleep restfully at night, cozily piled on top of each other.

It has been said that hounds must first be happy in the kennel before they can perform well when hunting. Everyone who visits the Iroquois hounds in their kennel can't help but smile at the sight of such happy dogs.

 


Masters
Iroquois Joint-Masters Dr. Jack van Nagell,  Lilla S. Mason, Jerry L. Miller
Photo by Dave Traxler

 

 

hounds

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 Iroquois Hunt Club - 2439 Grimes Mill Rd, Lexington, KY 40515 -- Contact Us